8 Ways The Brand New Dad Can Support The Brand New Breastfeeding Mom

A frittata with lots of fresh veggies added can make a fast, nutritous meal for new moms ( and dads) according to postpartum doula, Elaine Petrowski.

A frittata with lots of fresh veggies added can make a fast, nutritous meal for new moms ( and dads) according to postpartum doula, Elaine Petrowski.

There’s a brand new baby at your house.  And you are a brand new Dad living with a brand new breastfeeding Mom. Among all the other things you two have likely discovered you know nothing about in the last week or so,  you can’t figure out exactly how to help her since it’s pretty obvious, even for the uninitiated that you can’t feed the baby! But  your baby seems to want to eat all the time. And nobody is getting much sleep.

But the brand new Dad CAN support the brand new breastfeeding Mom. Here’s how:

1. Be the chef. Feed her so she can feed the baby. N0,  you don’t need to spoon the food into her.  Just be sure there is high-quality food at the ready for you to heat and offer to serve up for her. (Note high-quality designation.) You have limited time to eat these days so it follows that what you do eat should be as nutritious as possible. Meaning ramen noodles, pizza and fast food  are OUT, as they likely have been for the past 9 months. Soups, stews, a roast chicken, fresh deli-turkey, fruit, vegetables, salads, nuts, nut butters on whole grain toast etc. are in.

2. Be the “yes” man.  So (see above) say “YES” to family, friends and possibly even neighbors who ask if they can do anything to help. PRACTICE SAYING “Yes please. We would love it if you could drop off a nutritious meal ( or pick up some groceries, bring over a lasagna, roast a chicken, make some soup) so we don’t have to think about food!” (Practice this!)

3. Be the cheering squad. Tell her she’s doing a great job with your baby and that this is not EASY for anyone. And if “they” say it was for them, they are fibbing. (Insert several kisses and at least one huge hug here!)

4. Be the source of evidenced-based breastfeeding information if and when she’s searching. Offer to look online for answers if she has questions or concerns about breastfeeding. Read what you find out loud to her so you have the knowledge too and can be  her back-up brain. (Sleep deprivation plays funny tricks on otherwise smart and perfectly competent people.) The three best doula-appoved sites for evidenced-based breastfeeding information.  Not hearsay. Not old wives tales, but evidenced-backed information:

www.llli.org

www.kellymom.com

www.bestforbabes.com

5. Be her champion. When others others express doubt or concerns about breastfeeding, baby hunger, how soon he’s eating etc. etc. etc. step in and share your new knowledge about the benefits of breast milk with them.

6. Be her caretaker.  Offer her a back rub or a foot massage, some tea, time to shower. You get the idea.

7. Be your baby’s caretaker while Mom takes a nap. Take the baby once he’s been fed.  Change, swaddle and burp him and then gently help him back to sleep. Just holding him on your chest and maybe humming a tune is a great way to start.  Most newborns can NOT fall to sleep independently so please do NOT worry about spoiling him, no matter what your grandmother, boss,  neighbor,  dad, cousin or the mailman says!

NOT sure what any of this means?

8. Be the hero. Find and hire a postpartum doula to teach you BOTH everything you don’t know YET about your new baby! It’s best to do this BEFORE your baby is born, if at all possible. But if not, better late than never!

in Northern NJ -Contact me :Elaine @tendertimesdoula.com

Need a quick phone consult, payment via Paypal? 973-291-8200

www.doulamatch.net

www.Dona. org

www. CAPPA.net

All will connect you to a local postpartum doula.

 

SIGN UP FOR MY EMAIL LIST for updates on classes and events

Posted in babies, breastfeeding, doula, feeding a new baby, help with a new baby, how to get things done with a new baby in the house, infant care, newborn assistance, postpartum doula, tips for new parents, Uncategorized

Quickly Learn How to Care for Your Newborn Baby in Your Own Home

Photo by David Castillo Dominici courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Babies are wired to respond to the human voice, so talk to your newborn.

What do you suppose I think  would be the BEST New Year resolution for those expecting a baby soon?  Why — finding and hiring a postpartum doula (do-la) so you can learn how to care for your newborn baby in your own home — of course!

Well, at least it should be. But then again, I’m biased. I’m a postpartum doula who can help you learn how to care for your newborn baby. If you are expecting a baby in early 2015,  there’s still time to arrange for the support you’re sure to want/need when baby comes home. But add it to the top of your to-do lis for TODAY t so you are assured you’ll get a spot on my calendar.

Who needs a doula?

Working with an experienced DONA certified doula those first few days and weeks home can be invaluable for new parents, especially if you haven’t spent much time around newborns.  Doulas know that bringing a new little one home can be exhilarating, wonderful and exciting, but also exhausting and confusing, with all the varied advice you’ll receive. (Even when you DON’T ask for it!)  Second-time and beyond parents will really appreciate the help with older siblings and household errands and tasks like laundry so they can focus on bonding with and enjoying their newest family member.

While we are working together (in your home) so you can learn how to care for your new baby,  I’ll answer your questions with evidenced-based information (and NOT outdated, hand-me-down wives tales) and, if necessary, provide local resources.

Here’s a partial list of some of the most common questions I answer for my clients:

Is that  __________(fill-in-the-blank)  noise, burp, hiccup, stare, peeling skin etc. etc. normal?

Why doesn’t my baby sleep at night?

Is it true that I should not wake a sleeping baby?

How can I trim my babies fingernails?

How do I play with my new baby?

How do I know if she’s hungry? Tired?

How do I know when my baby has had enough to eat?

How can I  help my baby  sleep so that we/I can too?

Why do babies cry?

What can I do about it?

My  ____ (fill-in-the-blank) mom, mother-in-law, sister, aunt, neighbor,  doctor, pastor, father etc, etc. says we spoil her. Is that true?

When should I start talking to my baby? ( BONUS ANSWER: NOW See photo above!)

Am I spoiling my baby by holding her? sleeping with her? feeding her on demand?

How can I make  my baby’s bath time fun and relaxing for all?

Should I try to keep my baby awake in the daytime so she’ll sleep at night?

What temperature should the bedroom be?

How do I dress my baby for the weather?

What about SIDS prevention?

Is it okay to use a pacifier?

Should  breastfeeding be painful?

When can I start reading to him?

Can I use this sling, baby carrier now? And if so, how?

And in addition, I can also help with pet care, baby laundry, errands and meal preparations , nursery organizing etc. etc.

Call or email soon so I can reserve time to be with you. I will  provide evidenced-based information about infant care and behavior. And you’ll soon learn how to care for your newborn baby with confidence. So don’t be disappointed.

Oh.. and if family members are at a loss for what to get the pregnant mama for a birthday, shower or holiday gift – I offer gift certificates that can be applied to defray the cost of doula support. 🙂

I’m just a phone call (973-291-8200)  or an email away (Elaine @tendertimesdoula.com) www.tendertimesdoula.com if you are in Northern New Jersey.

If you are at a distance, check www.doulamatch.net or www.DONA.org and filter by zip code to find a local doula who serves your area.

Posted in babies, breastfeeding, doula, expectant parent, expecting, help with a new baby, how to get things done with a new baby in the house, infant care, newborn assistance, normal baby behavior, tips for new parents Tagged with: , , , ,

Must-do class for first-time expectant parents in Northern New Jersey

Elaine Petrowski, postpartum doula

Elaine Petrowski is a postpartum doula who lives and works in northern New Jersey.

Register HERE

As the time draws closer for the arrival of a baby, many first-time expectant parents become super excited. But in addition to the awe and anticipation first-time expectant parents often feel, they may also begin to become just a bit anxious. Because as the baby’s birth day approaches, it usually becomes pretty clear that many first-time expectant parents don’t actually know a whole lot about babies. (How I remember my own first days and weeks as a brand new bewildered, tired and anxious first-time mom. THE REASON I do this work!)

With that in mind, I’m offering a NEW informal, fun, multi-media day-long seminar for first-time expectant parents. (Or even for second and beyond parents who want to understand this baby a bit more.) Spending the day (next session: November 15,2014) with me,  a DONA- certified postpartum doula with more than 14 years of experience (more info at www.tendertimesdoula.com or check out what clients have to say at  http://doulamatch.net/profile/247/elaine-petrowski) will help first-time expectant parents learn about your baby before he or she arrives.

This is NOT an infant care class!

I want to make it crystal clear that this is not an infant care class. (You can find one of those at the local hospital.) And while we may touch on infant care topics like bathing, burping and swaddling, What to Expect When You Are No Longer Expecting is designed to teach you about your new baby’s behavior (#newbaby411?) REGISTER HERE.

Attending this class will mean you will have the answers to the most common questions that the hundreds of new parents I’ve worked with generally ask. But you will have the answers BEFORE your baby arrives. For example, babies do NOT eat, sleep, poop, communicate or act like children or adults. They act …well… just like babies. And we will steep ourselves in the knowledge of EXACTLY what “acting like a baby”looks and sounds like.

So while I can’t promise a completely angst-free first month at home with your baby, I can promise that you will come away from this day with solid, evidenced-based information, tips and tools that will make you a more confident new parent. In addition, you’ll have fun (and lunch) meet with board certified lactation consultant Carmen Baker-Clark IBCLC, and possibly meet some other local and like-minded first-time expectant parents.

Register by Oct. 31, 2014 and receive  a BONUS

 One 30-minute postpartum doula phone consult AFTER your baby arrives! 

 

Please feel free to SHARE this event on Facebook, Twitter and via Email using the links on this page!

Posted in babies, doula, expectant parent, expecting, family, help with a new baby, new baby, newborn assistance, parenting, postpartum doula, tips for new parents

Important info for every pregnant woman about your baby’s umbilical cord

If the umbilical cord is cut  too soon after birth, before it stops pulsing, your baby will have a lowered blood volume. Don't cut the cord until it stops pulsing, about 90 seconds.

If the umbilical cord is cut too soon after birth, before it stops pulsing, your baby will have a lowered blood volume. Don’t cut the cord until it stops pulsing, about 90 seconds.

Have you had a discussion with your care provider about delaying the clamping of your baby’s umbilical cord? It’s only a matter of 90 seconds and sounds like no big deal. But it’s really big stuff for your baby and you need to know about it. It will take a little bit more than one minute for you to learn about the importance of delayed umbilical cord clamping.

This short little video, by pediatrician Dr. Alan Greene, will tell you why this is so important.

Dr. Greene talks about the oxygen, antibodies, iron and red and white blood cells that babies can miss out on because of this modern medical practice. I know as a postpartum doula I wonder if the high incidence of newborn jaundice that I see with my client’s babies (and which can be a serious medical event for a newborn) is in fact related to this rapid umbilical cord cutting and thus a lower blood volume.

Contact Tender Times Doula early in your last trimester to reserve your  in-home support  (and get more great information like this) after your baby is born. Call 973-291-8200 today! I offer a variety of packages to meet all budget needs.

Posted in babies, delayed umbilical cord clamping, doula, help with a new baby, infant care, new baby, newborn assistance, postpartum doula, tips for new parents

More mysterious but totally normal newborn behavior explained

Newborn babies sometimes mystify first-time parents with their behavior. A postpartum doula explains normal newborn behavior. Photo by papaija2008 courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Newborn babies sometimes mystify first-time parents with their behavior. A postpartum doula explains normal newborn behavior. Photo by papaija2008 courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

If  you are new to the world of babies, there are some seemingly mysterious newborn behaviors that you may not know about but that are totally normal newborn behavior. Get familiar with this list and you won’t freak out when your baby

Cries, cries, cries  when you bathe him. Doula Hint: Invest in a Primo Infant Bath Seat and make sure the bath water is warm enough. Fill the sink partway up to the baby’s chest. And NEVER, EVER take your eyes, or hands, off the baby while bathing him.

Sleeps well only when held. Doula Hint: Co-sleep. Or get a sling or carrier so your baby can sleep while you do chores, take a walk, read to your toddler, answer emails or have a snack. (No cooking or eating hot foods though while baby is in the sling or carrier.)

Sucks on her fingers. Yes, even after you’ve  just fed her, she may want to suck on her hands, fingers or even your shirt. Sucking is, after all, a survival mechanism and your baby needs to be good at it. BTW: This is not newly learned behavior. Your baby started this COMFORT MEASURE in utero. And no, it will NOT likely turn her into a lifelong thumbsucker. If it’s just about time to feed your baby and you notice the sucking motions, good for you. You’ve picked up on an infant HUNGER CUE. If vigorous finger, fist, shoulder sucking begins after a feeding, it’s likely she is comforting herself. If in doubt, especially with a breastfed baby, always offer the breast again.

Yawns. It’s not only cute, it’s normal newborn behavior and  it’s a tired cue. Your baby needs to be helped to sleep right now. (Research confirms that only 5% of babies under four months of age are capable of putting themselves to sleep.) Swaddle her and hold her until she is soundly asleep. Then take a nap yourself. Doula Hint: Do NOT attempt to keep your baby awake when she exhibits her tired cue. Yes, she may stay awake another half hour. But  by the next time the urge to sleep overtakes her, she will likely be overtired and thus more difficult to help off to sleep. Heed her cues when you first notice them and do not allow her to be overstimulated or get over tired.

 

Elaine Petrowski is a certified postpartum doula (DONA) with more than a dozen years of experience . A postpartum doula is a professional,  with the mission of helping new parents to quickly gain confidence in their parenting skills. Contact Elaine at www.tendertimesdoula.com, 973-291-8200.

Know someone who is expecting soon or who just brought a new baby home?  Please share this post.

Posted in babies, breastfeeding, feeding a new baby, help with a new baby, infant care, new baby, newborn assistance, normal baby behavior, parenting, postpartum doula, tips for new parents, Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , ,

A doula explains some mysterious but normal newborn behaviors

If  you are new to the world of babies, there are some mysterious but normal newborn behaviors that you may not know about. Get familiar with this list and you won’t freak out when your baby

Brand new baby by papaija2008

Newborns have many behaviors you might not realize are totally normal infant behavior. Photo by papaija2008 courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Poops. And not just once, but many times a day if he is breastfed. Normal newborn behavior. What goes in must come out! (And yes, it does look like cottage cheese and mustard mixed together if you are breastfeeding your baby.)

Fuss a bit before he poops.This is a normal newborn behavior that is not necessarily gas but rather a sign of a brand new, functioning, but still immature, digestive tract. Wait a few weeks and it will likely disappear. Doula Hint: You can help your baby by holding him close against your warm shoulder and rubbing his back or tummy GENTLY until he poops.

Wakes up, the second you put her down. Doula Hint: Consider safe co-sleeping or co-rooming. You’ll all sleep better. Or swaddle your newborn baby for sleep to help calm the startle reflex she was born with. Doula Hint: Babies need to be deeply asleep before you can put them down, even if they are swaddled. Wait for 15-20 minutes or so or until you can move the baby gently and get no response. Then you can try putting her down. Be aware though, it’s normal newborn behavior for her to NOT want to be alone. (Congratulations: your baby is already a smart survivor who knows she needs care and how to demand it!)

Spits up. If your baby spits up after a feeding, try burping him early in the feeding rather than waiting until the end. If you get an early burp, most likely you won’t get one later on.Doula Hint: It may look like a lot came back at you, but most times, it’s not really all that much. (Splash a tablespoon of water on your shirt to see just what I mean.) If your baby regularly spits up large amounts, talk to your pediatrician, or see a lactation consultant to resolve potential oversupply issues.

Cries, cries, cries every time you change her. Again, totally normal newborn behavior. It’s not you and you ‘re not doing anything “wrong.” Doula Hint: get a wipe warmer. Though much-maligned as useless, for sensitive babies a wipe warmer can make diaper changes more pleasant for everyone. By the end of the first month or so your voice will begin to soothe baby and things will calm down a bit at changing time. So start talking to her while you change diapers if you have not already.

Coming next: The doula explains more mysterious but totally normal newborn behavior.

Elaine Petrowski is a certified postpartum doula (DONA) with more than a dozen years of experience . A postpartum doula is a professional,  with the mission of helping new parents to quickly gain confidence in their parenting skills. Contact Elaine at www.tendertimesdoula.com, 973-291-8200.

Know someone who is expecting soon or who just brought a new baby home?  Please share this post with them.

Posted in babies, doula, feeding a new baby, help with a new baby, normal baby behavior, parenting, tips for new parents, Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

A mocktail party for moms-to-be to plan baby’s first month home

Here’s the invite to Tender Times Doula’s Mocktail party for moms-to- be. We’ll enjoy mocktails and then share tips so the moms-to-be can start putting together their post-pregnancy support plans.

I’m really getting excited about this fun, new venture of mine, hosting a Mocktail Party for moms-to-be on April 20,2013 from 3-5 p.m at Plasker Family Chiropractic Center.

I’m trying not to get too carried away with plans, but I do love a well-themed party. So I’ve hunted up evidenced-based information to share with the moms-to-be. And I’ll be sharing lots of proven tips to help new moms through that first joyful,but exhausting month home with baby. The goal of the afternoon, besides getting to know each other and having some baby fun, will be to help these forward -thinking moms-to-be formulate a plan for their first month home with baby.

Twenty moms-to-be (space limitations!) will also be getting to know each other while sharing mocktails (already have the recipes chosen) and healthy (well… mostly) snacks. And I’m putting together goodie bags chock full of  local resources.

As an incentive to REGISTER EARLY, I’ll be drawing one name from among those moms-to-be who register before noon on April 5 to refund her ticket price (a bargain at $10!)  And finally, I’ve decided to hand-knit a special door prize for one lucky winner, who I hope will promise to send me a photo of  her little one wearing that prize (hint) along about Halloween.

Can’t give away too much more about the event, but if you know any moms-to-be, please send them to the home page of my website to register. Space limitations make registration a MUST. Or contact me at 973-291-8200, elaine @tendertimesdoula.com and I’ll mail one of those adorable invitations (above)  right to their home.

 

 

Posted in babies, doula, help with a new baby, how to get things done with a new baby in the house, new baby, newborn assistance, postpartum doula, tips for new parents Tagged with: , , , , ,

A doula’s tips to successfully breastfeed a newborn

 

Getting breastfeeding established means you just might need to wake your newborn to nurse. www.Freedigitalphotos.net.

If you are currently attempting to successfully breastfeed a newborn (or about to give birth and are planning to breastfeed) I bet you already know about the advice to feed your baby often, as much as 8-12 times per day. Don’t know if you’ve done the math on that one yet, but it’s not hard to figure out that if your baby eats the recommended eight times, you’ll be feeding him about every three hours. And if she eats the potential twelve times, you’ll be feeding her about every two hours. And so on.

Simple, right?  But what do you do if your sleepy newborn, unlike the baby on the advice websites or in the breastfeeding books, does not wake every two to three hours to breastfeed? What, if like so many sleepy newborns I’ve met, your baby seems to want to sleep for three and half or four or even five straight hours, especially during the first two weeks of life or after being outdoors for just a few minutes? How will you fit in the advised number of feedings if your baby seems to want to sleep longer?

Don’t panic. It’s simple. In order to feed your newborn the prescribed (and important) number of 8-12 times you might actually need to wake him or her up to breastfeed.

That’s right. I suggested waking a sleeping baby.

At least in the first few weeks after birth. And until you are sure your milk has begun to flow abundantly and your baby’s weight rises back up to birth weight or beyond. Contrary to some “old wives tale” advice, you do sometimes meed to wake a sleeping baby for the important task of breastfeeding.

So go right ahead and wake your  newborn when he/she goes past the 2.5 or 3 hour mark. Especially if it’s during the day. Or  at night if your pediatrician suggested it, your baby is under 6 pounds, or there is any concern about jaundice or low weight gain.

 

Coming next: Baby Basics Bootcamp

 

Elaine Petrowski is a certified postpartum doula (DONA) with more than a dozen years of experience.  As a postpartum doula,  my mission is to help new parents to quickly gain confidence in their parenting skills. Contact Elaine at www.tendertimesdoula.com, 973-291-8200.

Know someone who is expecting soon or who just brought a new baby home? Please share this post and site.

Posted in babies, breastfeeding, doula, feeding a new baby, help with a new baby, new baby, newborn assistance, postpartum doula, tips for new parents Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Reasons for new parents in NJ to “like” Tender Times Doula on Facebook

Elaine Petrowski, postpartum doula

Elaine Petrowski is a postpartum doula who lives and works in northern New Jersey.

Why “LIKE” Tender Times Doula’s Facebook Page when, as a new parent, it seems like just one more thing to fit into an already overflowing day?

Because, as a new parent  with your baby finally in arms, I’m betting that you’re hungry for SOLID INFORMATION, RESEARCH and FACTS  about babies, not just opinions or guesses. How much and how often should my baby eat? Why doesn’t my baby sleep? Should I or should I not co-sleep, swaddle or use a pacifier? What do all those funny baby-dinosaur noises mean?

Tender Times Doula on Facebook posts USEFUL INFORMATION for parents, especially parents who lean in the direction of  a holistic approach to early parenting i.e. breastfeeding, baby cues, baby led weaning, co-sleeping, good nutrition, safe baby care products, whole and organic foods, complementary healthcare modalities etc. I regularly post news and information on really important issues such as circumcision or what to do when your baby has a fever.  And sometimes, just for a smile, you’ll find a parenting-related cartoon to brighten your day and let you know you are NOT alone facing the fun, chaos and yes, frustrations, of early parenting.

Tender Times Doula on Facebook posts EVENTS that might be of interest to you as a new parent. I post notice of my parenting groups, baby sign classes, infant massage classes, grandparent classes, etc.  And I  strive to post webinars, meetings, workshops and resources offered by others that could be of value to your growing family.

You can be part of the Tender Times Doula COMMUNITY and join with other parents, sharing the joys and concerns you are  all experiencing.

Come on over. “LIKE” the page. Click on the box below “like” on Facebook and check off “Get notifications.”  Then please “like”, “comment” and  “share” some of the  posts with others and grow the community with me.

 

Elaine Petrowski is a certified postpartum doula (DONA) with more than a dozen years of experience . A postpartum doula is a professional,  with the mission of helping new parents to quickly gain confidence in their parenting skills. Contact Elaine at www.tendertimesdoula.com, 973-291-8200.

Know someone who is expecting soon or who just brought a new baby home? Please feel free to share this post.

 

 

Posted in babies, doula, family, feeding a new baby, newborn assistance, parenting, tips for new parents Tagged with: , , , , ,

Calm a crying newborn with these tips from a postpartum doula

crying baby by Nutdanai ApikhomboonwarootThe very first time you need to calm a crying newborn is a challenge for all new parents. When your newborn baby begins crying persistently (and you have already tried feeding him and he’s refused) what are you going to do? Try any (or maybe even all) of these tips to help calm a crying newborn. Most likely, one of these time tested ideas will work. And you’ll begin to feel like a parenting pro.

Move. Walk, dance, rock. Sit on one of those giant exercise balls and gently bounce up and down with a crying newborn baby in your arms, until she falls asleep and has been asleep for about fifteen minutes or so. Then swaddle her and put her down to sleep next to you and take a nap. (see below)

Hold him skin-to- skin. Take off all your baby’s clothing, except for his diaper. Open your shirt and put the crying newborn on your bare chest. (Either Mom or Dad can do this.) If you’re cold, put a blanket over the two of you. Or button the shirt around both of you. It generally only take a few minutes of peaceful snuggling to calm a crying newborn in this position. Keeping your baby in this position has been scientifically shown to regulate body temperature, calm parent and baby, and improve breastfeeding skills and milk supply.

Sleep next to him.  Before you baby arrives, beg or borrow a co-sleeper from friends.  What’s a co-sleeper? It’s a little sidecar that fits snugly up against your bed and allows your newborn baby to do WHAT HE OR SHE IS BIOLOGICALLY PROGRAMMED TO DO: stay right next to you all night long. A co-sleeper or snuggle nest keeps your baby safe, but contented because he feels safe and warm, and eliminates your fear of rolling over on him. And safe co-sleeping, with the proper gear, is much safer than napping on the sofa. Or spending the night sitting up in a chair holding your baby.

Don’t worry about spoiling your newborn. There is no such thing. All these strong newborn needs you are witnessing –  motion, to be held skin-to-skin, or to sleep right next to you- will gradually disappear over the first few months of your baby’s life. You are NOT spoiling your baby by answering his cries. You are building trust and meeting the needs your baby has now. And hopefully keeping you, your partner and your baby blissfully calm and sleeping. At least for a few hours at a time.

Share your thoughts on how these tips worked for you to calm a crying newborn in the comments, below.

A postpartum doula is a professional,  with the mission of helping new parents to quickly gain confidence in their parenting skills. Contact Elaine at Tender Times at www.tendertimesdoula.com, 973-291-8200.

Know someone who is expecting or who just brought a new baby home? Please feel free to share this post.

Posted in babies, breastfeeding, doula, infant care, new baby, newborn assistance, postpartum doula, sleeping when you have a new baby, tips for new parents Tagged with: , , , ,